RESEARCH ARTICLE

Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis Ioannis Parodis1*, Laurent Arnaud1, Jakob Gerhardsson1, Agneta Zickert1, Birgitta Sundelin2, Vivianne Malmström1, Elisabet Svenungsson1, Iva Gunnarsson1 1 Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, 2 Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden * [email protected]

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Abstract

OPEN ACCESS Citation: Parodis I, Arnaud L, Gerhardsson J, Zickert A, Sundelin B, Malmström V, et al. (2016) Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis. PLoS ONE 11(6): e0158076. doi:10.1371/journal. pone.0158076 Editor: Jose Crispin, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, MEXICO Received: April 23, 2016 Accepted: June 9, 2016 Published: June 23, 2016 Copyright: © 2016 Parodis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Data Availability Statement: All relevant data are within the paper. Funding: This study was supported by grants from the Swedish Research Council, Swedish Rheumatism Association, King Gustaf V’s 80-year Foundation, Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation, Foundation in memory of Clas Groschinsky, Stockholm County Council and Karolinska Institutet Foundations.

Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3–18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p

Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alte...
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