THE INDIAN MEDICAL GAZETTE.

292

qualification;

THE

mere

[August

but in truth

something

1898.

more

scholastic attainment is necessary

than

to make

comparison with European students possible, The conditions of life in which the majority of Indian students live at present render this unattainable; and we need not go into the point which appeared some years ago to give offence where it was not intended, and to lend acrimony a

Jtulhnt JiJiUdipl (Sazqttq. AUGUST,

1898.

to the diseussion.

MEDICAL EDUCATION IN INDIA.

In

fixing

a

uniform

prelimi-

want is a

fair, allnary examination, what we We have seen recently a circular issued by round test, but not one of any great severity. the Council of the " Indian Medical Association" We will next consider the nature of the qualicalling attention to several points in medical fication to be obtained at the end of the appointeducation and degrees as obtained in this coun- ed medical the Council here

curriculum; again points out the desirabi lity of uniformit}\ In Great Britain the one portal system has frequentty been under consideration; the number of different a claim to which they cannot be said to have diplomas and the difference in their value are on one side for the be can put present, any right, and must be most perplexing to the public and as it does not detract from the importance of the to parents who wish to send their sons into the raised. medieal profession. It certainly is to be hoped questions The first of them that we may consider is that a similar condition of things will not be of these points are worthy of attention ; and the fact that this Council lays claim to represent the medical profession in India,

try.

Many

the standard of preliminary education and the inequality of the preliminary examinations demanded by the different Universities. On cannot but agree that it is extremely desirable that this standard should be suffi-

this

we

ciently high in

profession

aud

uniform,

but

unfortunately,

at all

events, it is the local medical who have prevented the establishment

Bombay

uniformity. When the different schemes brought forward by Brigade-Surgeon Wellington Gray, Drs. Maconachie, Khory, Bahadurji and others, it was found impossible to get anything like agreement; and it was argued that the papers for the Matriculation of the Bombay University proved that their of such were

standard

was

equal

to

that

of

the London

Matriculation, if not higher : as if, indeed, the standard of any examination is shewn by the nature of the questions asked. It is one thing to difficult questions, but the examiner does not

put necessarily require

a

very

high

standard

of

answer.

This

sort of arg ument was,

sufficient

for

who had made up their minds which side they were to vote.

beforehand

however,

men

on

And indeed the bias shewn, on the occasion referred to, pretty well proves the inability of the Senate of an Indian University to fairly consider the whole question. In our opinion the First Arts of the Calcutta University, with perhaps the test in English somewhat altered, would be a sufficient examination for a medieal

allowed to obtain in India. Ahead}' there are too many, and the reference made to the diplothe letters V. L. M. S. and mas indicated by L. T. M. S.

by

the Council is to the

would be better indeed

if medical

point. It qualification

in future

only to be obtained at the Uniafter examinations and curriculums of versities, absolute uniformity in the differentPresidencies,? all other diplomas should be abolished. The public were

would then be able to form a better opinion of the nature and standard of medical diplomas; at present they regard some of them ao little better than fraudulent titles. So much for the ordinary medical student and his examination. As regards the military medical pupil and the

hospital-assistant,

we

do not consider that it is

at all necessary to

lengthen the curriculum or alter their qualification. The military medical pupil is

educated for a particular position by Government, which very generally pays him as well. We doubt if any such advantages can be obtained uuder any other Government in the world; the

of very often poor, but respectable, are provided with a career, and not only

sons

people

educated for it. For the purpose for which these lads are educated, we are of opinion that a four-year course is a sufficiently long one; that, but

are

the qualification which they receive is one which allows them to practise in the service. It would perhaps be better to limit their practice to the

' service

only;

but when

a

man

is desirous of

August

293

much more efficient, and the power of punishing public, it should be possible for offenders would be very much greater than those complete, at his own expense, a medical of a General Medical Council. It be said

practising him to

MODERN TREATMENT OF FRACTURES.

1898.] in

may that of the that in England the General Medical Council civil medical pupil. This should be allowed after only exists because the Government will not take a certain number of years have elapsed from up this matter. There are many in the medical the time that he entered. It appears unfair to at home who think that the interests profession educate men gratuitously and make it possible of the medical profession should be entirely in for them to compete with men who have had to the hands of the Government, and that quacks pay for the whole of their medical education. and all kinds of practitioners not possessing The same maybe said as regards the hospitalwould then cease to exist. assistant class; no very high standard of general proper qualifications for this rules purpose would have to education is required for them. They fulfil very Stringent made there would not be be made, but when fairly the services for which they are required; much difficulty in having them attended to. they are not, however, too highly paid. On the The General Medical Council can do little but other hand, some of them are able to increase medical education and punish the oftheir pay by private work. Here, again, it is per- regulate of fences any member of the profession to a haps not desirable that they should compete with certain extent, but it is powerless to prevent local graduates; they were educated specially for on the public, service requirements. Still in out-of-the-way- the army of quacks from preying to be that us to seems and the course only their services be the places may required by the regulation of education and medical practice public, when it is impossible to secure those of should be entirely in the hands of Government. a civil practitioner; and under these conditions rules might be laid down to which strict atten- It remains therefore for the profession to endeation would have to be paid, otherwise any vour to get Government to take up this matter thoroughly. This it may possibly do if the whole breach of them could be course

in all

respects

the

same

as

easily enough

brought

It appears to us, too, that the state- question is placed before the authorities in a ments made by the Council with regard to the proper light and well supported b}' the whole of medical practitioners. appointment of professors are considerably ex- body aggerated. Due attention is paid to selection for to notice.

appointments by the authorities; but it perhaps impossible to altogether prevent changes which the exigencies of the service may these

is

necessitate; at any rate, these very statements tend to shew that there is not much danger of professorships being held for too long, in fact the age rules of the service prevent such an occurrence, and there is little doubt but that the same rules might apply also to all Europeans and Natives this for

holding teaching appointments.

country the mental faculties are long as in colder climates. If a

so

In

not active man

in the

certain age, the same may be said of another who is not in the service himself; the fact of his being or not being in the service does not affect his mental

service is considered unfit at

a

at a certain period. It seems to us that the Directors of Public Instruction iu conjunction with the Principals of the various colleges could very well make up a scheme which would cover the whole of medical

capacity

education, and the due medical practice might

ground

observance of rules for be enforced by Govern-

ment, in whose hands the working would be

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