Clinical Infectious Diseases Advance Access published October 1, 2014 1 

Progress toward curing HIV infections with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation 

cr ipt

  Stephen T. Smiley1, Anjali Singh1, Sarah W. Read1, Opendra K. Sharma1, Diana Finzi1, Clifford Lane2 and  Jeffrey S. Rice3  1

Division of AIDS, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 

2

Clinical and Molecular Retrovirology Section, Laboratory of Immunoregulation, National Institute of 

an

Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland  3

Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious 

M

Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 

Corresponding author: Stephen T. Smiley, Division of AIDS, NIAID, NIH, DHHS, 5601 Fishers Lane, Room  9E45, Bethesda, MD 20892‐9830 [for Courier Services, use Rockville, MD 20852], 240‐627‐3071 (phone), 

pt ed

240‐627‐3106 (fax), [email protected] 

Alternate corresponding author: Jeffrey S. Rice, PhD, DAIT, NIAID, NIH, DHHS, 5601 Fishers Lane, Room  6B34, Bethesda, MD 20892‐9827 [for Courier Services, use Rockville, MD 20852], 240‐627‐3552 (phone), 

 

ce

301‐480‐0693 (fax), [email protected] 

Brief Summary/Key points:  To date, only one person seems to have been cured of HIV infection.  This 

Ac

report describes efforts to exploit HSCT to cure HIV in cancer patients requiring such procedures and in  the broader community of HIV infected persons.   

Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This  work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

Bethesda, Maryland 

2  Abstract  Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) can suppress HIV infection but cannot completely 

cr ipt

eradicate the virus.  A major obstacle in the quest for a cure is the difficulty in targeting and measuring  latently infected cells.  To date, a single person seems to have been cured of HIV.  Hematopoietic stem  cell transplantation (HSCT) preceded this cancer patient’s long‐term sustained HIV remission but 

researchers have been unable to replicate this cure and the mechanisms that led to HIV remission 

sponsored a workshop that provided a venue for in‐depth discussion of whether HSCT could be 

an

exploited to cure HIV in cancer patients requiring such procedures.  Participants also discussed how  HSCT might be applied to a broader community of HIV infected persons in whom the risks of HSCT 

Ac

ce

pt ed

M

currently outweigh the likelihood and benefits of HIV cure.   

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

remain to be established.  In February 2014, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases 

3    Since the start of the AIDS epidemic, vast resources have been dedicated to the treatment and 

cr ipt

prevention of HIV infection.  Today, cART can control and suppress viremia to near‐undetectable levels  but is unable to completely eradicate the virus [1, 2].  Low levels of HIV persist in patients on cART and  viremia rebounds upon cessation of therapy, typically within just a few weeks.  Thus, HIV‐infected  persons must remain on therapy indefinitely.  A number of concerns with cART, including drug 

major obstacle in the quest for a cure is the difficulty in identifying, targeting and measuring the 

an

reservoir of latently infected cells [3, 4]. 

The 2009 report [5] that a cancer patient had been cured of HIV infection following HSCT was 

M

received with much interest in both the HIV and transplantation research communities.  That individual  remains free of detectable HIV despite cessation of cART more than seven years ago.  However,  researchers have been unable to replicate this patient’s cure in other HSCT recipients, and the 

pt ed

mechanisms that led to his sustained remission have yet to be established.  Several non‐mutually  exclusive hypotheses have been proposed: the pre‐transplant conditioning regimen may have reduced  the number of HIV‐infected cells, the transplant donor’s genetics may have prevented infection of the  graft, and/or graft versus host (GVH) responses may have eradicated the latent HIV reservoirs.  

ce

Determining the mechanisms of HIV eradication in this patient and learning how to exploit those 

mechanisms to cure others will require collaboration between HIV and transplantation researchers.  To 

Ac

that end, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored a workshop entitled “Graft  versus Host Responses in HIV Eradication” in Bethesda, Maryland on February 10‐11, 2014.  The  workshop provided a venue for in‐depth discussion of the potential to exploit HSCT to cure HIV infection 

in cancer patients requiring such procedures.  Participants also discussed how HSCT might be applied to 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

interactions, toxicities, costs, viral resistance and patient adherence, drive a desire to identify a cure.  A 

4  a broader community of HIV infected persons, in whom the risks of HSCT currently outweigh the  likelihood and benefit of HIV cure.   

cr ipt

  Associations between allogeneic HSCT and HIV cures 

Several reports have described HIV‐infected patients who may have eradicated HIV subsequent 

patient” [5].  In 2007, this HIV‐infected man with acute myeloid leukemia received myeloablative  therapy and an allogeneic HSCT from a donor whose cells were resistant to HIV infection due to being 

an

homozygous for CCR5‐D32, a nonfunctional allele of the CCR5 co‐receptor used by HIV to infect human  cells [7].  He developed mild GVH disease (GVHD), which was readily treated, and received a second 

M

HSCT from the same donor when his leukemia recurred.  cART was stopped at the time of the first CCR5‐ D32 transplant and he has now gone without antivirals for more than seven years.  He sporadically tests  borderline positive for HIV nucleic acids using sensitive PCR‐based assays but shows no evidence of 

pt ed

productive HIV infection [8].  His HIV‐specific T cell and antibody responses have waned [8].  He is  considered cured. 

In light of the Berlin report, much optimism was generated by a 2013 report that HIV eradication  may have been achieved in two Boston patients [9].  Under the cover of cART, these men received 

ce

reduced intensity conditioning regimens followed by allogeneic HSCT from CCR5 wild type donors.  They  both developed GVHD and appeared to completely clear their HIV infections.  Neither had detectable 

Ac

viral reservoirs nor HIV‐specific T cell responses in their peripheral blood.  However, unlike the Berlin  patient, viremia returned in both Boston patients when they subsequently discontinued cART.  Their  viral rebounds occurred with greatly delayed kinetics as compared with typical HIV patients, and viral  genome analysis suggests their rebounds resulted from very small numbers of infected cells (Timothy 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

to receiving allogeneic HSCT to treat a malignancy [6].  The best‐documented case is that of the “Berlin 

5  Henrich, unpublished).  These observations suggest HSCT had significantly, albeit incompletely, reduced  their HIV reservoirs.   

cr ipt

   The challenge: latent reservoirs of HIV 

There have been reports of other unsuccessful attempts to repeat the Berlin patient’s cure [2].  

limitations in peripheral blood measurements for the assessment of potential cures, and demonstrate  that current assays do not have the sensitivity required to detect low‐level HIV infections. 

an

Following HIV infection, some infected CD4 T cells differentiate into long‐lived, resting memory  T cells that contain integrated proviruses [3, 4].  These memory CD4 cells are believed to create a latent 

M

HIV reservoir that resists cART and is invisible to the immune system.  Upon their activation, these  latently infected T cells can produce HIV.  Since the half‐life of infected memory cells has been estimated 

pt ed

to be 44 months, it could take more than 70 years for patients on fully suppressive cART to eradicate  these reservoirs.  

Currently, the gold standard assay for measuring reservoirs of replication competent HIV is the  quantitative viral outgrowth assay [3, 4].  Unfortunately, this assay is suboptimal for cure research: it is 

ce

labor intensive, requires large volumes of peripheral blood or leukapheresis, and significantly  underestimates the size of the replication‐competent reservoir [10].  PCR‐based assays of proviral HIV  DNA in peripheral blood are more sensitive but cannot distinguish replication competent and 

Ac

incompetent virus.  Moreover, even PCR assays failed to detect the Boston patients’ latent reservoirs.   These observations highlight the need for better assays.  They also suggest there may be other, yet to be 

identified, HIV reservoirs.   

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

These cases highlight a significant challenge: eliminating the latent HIV reservoir.  They also point to 

6  Disrupting latency (e.g. by activating latent proviral genomes in T cells) might help to eradicate  HIV reservoirs.  Initial efforts to this end aimed to non‐specifically activate all latently infected T cells 

cr ipt

while preventing infection of other cells with cART.  The hope was that the activated, HIV‐producing  cells would succumb to virus‐induced cytotoxicity, as had been observed in vitro.  Clinical trials using IL‐ 2, IL‐7, or anti‐CD3 to this end highlighted a number of complexities, including that latently infected T 

cells persist despite reactivation in the presence of cART [2].  Current efforts of this type aim to disrupt 

clearance mechanisms, perhaps induced by an anti‐HIV therapeutic vaccine [11].  In vitro studies suggest 

an

protein kinase C [12] and histone deacetylase inhibitors [13] can shock a fraction of proviruses out of  latency, and modestly encouraging results have been obtained in patients using the FDA‐approved  histone deacetylase inhibitor Vorinostat [14].  Further exploration of the use of latency‐reversing agents 

M

for the eradication of HIV reservoirs, especially in combination and in the context of HSCT, is warranted.   

pt ed

Can pre‐transplant conditioning eradicate HIV reservoirs?   During HSCT, pre‐transplant conditioning is used to reduce the burden of malignant cells and  create space for the engraftment of transplanted hematopoietic cells.  The Berlin patient received  several rounds of aggressive, high intensity conditioning for his transplants, including myeloablative 

ce

total body irradiation (TBI) and T cell‐depleting antithymocyte immunoglobulin [5].  In contrast, both  Boston patients received non‐myeloablative reduced intensity conditioning [9].  While it is possible the 

Ac

Berlin patient’s more aggressive conditioning contributed to his cure, HIV DNA was readily measurable  in peripheral blood samples from both the Berlin and Boston patients immediately after transplantation,  suggesting that neither conditioning regimen sufficed to eradicate HIV reservoirs.   

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

latency without globally activating T cells and then specifically kill the virus‐producing cells via immune 

7  Studies presented at the workshop suggested that high intensity myeloablative conditioning  administered prior to autologous HSCT is insufficient to eliminate HIV reservoirs in humans even when 

cr ipt

cART is rigorously maintained [15].  Non‐human primate (NHP) models likewise support the idea that TBI  is insufficient to eliminate HIV reservoirs since viremia rebounded rapidly after cART cessation when 

rhesus macaques were infected with a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), treated 

with cART, given TBI, and then transplanted with SHIV‐free autologous cells (Leslie Kean, unpublished).  

resistant to depletion by TBI or anti‐CD3 immunotoxin (Michele Di Mascio, unpublished), potentially 

an

explaining why these conditioning regimens fail to eradicate all latently infected cells.    The accumulated data suggest that even high intensity conditioning regimens will not suffice to  eradicate HIV reservoirs.  Notably, TBI and other myeloablative regimen are highly immunosuppressive 

M

and likely too hazardous for HIV‐infected patients who are not suffering from life‐threatening  malignancies.  Thus, it will be important to define the relative reservoir‐depleting capacities of various 

pt ed

conditioning regimens and determine which, if any, are safe enough for healthy HIV patients on stable  cART, where the benefits of HIV cure need to be weighed carefully against the significant risks  associated with conditioning regimens.     

ce

Can GVH responses eradicate HIV reservoirs? 

Conditioning regimens will likely fail to eradicate all cells containing replication competent HIV.  

Ac

Conceptually, GVH responses resulting from allogeneic cell transplants could be exploited to further 

reduce or eradicate HIV reservoirs, just as graft versus leukemia (GVL) responses can reduce or eradicate 

leukemic cells [17].  Minimizing the morbid consequences of GVHD while stimulating graft versus viral  reservoir (GVVR) responses will be a significant obstacle to using HSCT in HIV cure regimens.   

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

In related studies using whole body imaging of macaques [16], it was shown that splenic CD4 cells are 

8  CD34‐expressing stem cells together with mature donor T cells and NK cells are a source of  immune system replenishment following HSCT [18].  GVHD results from alloreactive T cells encountering 

cr ipt

recipient cells presenting alloantigens, leading to the destruction of epithelial and endothelial surfaces,  as well as hematopoietic cells.  Dividing cells, including tissue‐regenerating stem cells, are the primary 

targets.  The severity of GVHD reflects the balance between immune damage and tissue repair, with the  extent of damage dictated primarily by the number and nature of mismatched antigens [19, 20].  Other 

repair deficiencies, cytokine polymorphisms), as well as the extent of organ damage before or during the 

an

transplant, dose of T cells in the graft, and frequency of regulatory T cells [19‐22].   

Depleting T cells from grafts prior to transplantation can prevent GVHD, however, these grafts  are deficient in desirable GVL responses, engraft less efficiently, and predispose to high rates of 

M

infection [22, 23].  One potential solution is to transplant T cell‐depleted grafts and then use donor  lymphocyte infusions (DLI) to selectively repopulate desirable T cell populations [23].  Other potential 

pt ed

approaches include transplantation of in vitro expanded donor HIV‐specific T cells or T cells transduced  with chimeric antigen receptors that recognize HIV [23].  Unfortunately, HIV’s extensive capacity to  mutate may enable escape from these approaches.  Alternatively, DLI with cytokine‐induced NK cells  may provide GVL and GVVR responses with minimal GVHD; NK cell‐based transplant approaches may 

ce

also be advantageous as these cells are not susceptible to HIV infection.  Still another possibility is the  selective depletion of alloreactive T cells, either ex vivo or in vivo [24, 25].  This approach has been used 

Ac

successfully to reduce GVHD during HSCT for sickle cell disease [26].  In contrast to transplanted allogeneic T cells, which cause GVHD by damaging epithelia and 

endothelia, transplanted NK cells only target recipient hematopoietic cells [27].  Thus, NK cells assist GVL 

responses by eradicating leukemic cells without contributing to GVHD [27].  It is plausible that allogeneic  NK cell responses might similarly produce GVVR responses following HSCT. 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

factors influencing GVHD include the patients’ age, microbiota, nutritional status, and genetics (e.g. DNA 

9  NK cell activation is regulated in part by interactions between HLA molecules and KIR receptors,  for which there are activating and inhibitory isoforms, as well as allelic diversity [27].  NK cells expressing 

cr ipt

the KIR3DL1 receptor can kill autologous cells infected with HIV [28] and certain KIR3DL1 alleles protect  against HIV when combined with specific HLA‐Bw4 alleles [29].  This combination likely activates NK cells  to kill HIV‐producing cells.  The selection of HSCT donors with favorable NK cell genetics might prevent  the establishment of new reservoirs post‐transplant by enabling NK cells to kill donor hematopoietic 

eradicating HIV reservoirs [20, 27, 30].   HLA‐C genotypes should also be taken into account when 

an

choosing allogeneic donors for HIV‐infected patients, since high‐level expression of HLA‐C protects  against HIV [31] but contributes to GVHD when mismatched [20].  The Berlin patient was matched for  HLA alleles but mismatched for KIRs.  It is not known whether KIR immunogenetics contributed to his 

M

elimination of HIV, but the available data suggests these factors should be considered in future HSCT  regimens for HIV‐infected individuals.  Recent advances in NHP genotyping may allow these issues to be 

pt ed

investigated in NHP models [32], as well as in human studies.  Since many patients appear to achieve full donor chimerism without developing overt GVHD, it  should be possible to safely use GVH responses to exert significant GVVR activity in HIV‐infected patients  requiring HSCT for malignancies.  Interestingly, Vorinostat, which can disrupt HIV latency, has been 

ce

shown to reduce GVHD in HSCT recipients without having deleterious effects on engraftment or  malignancy relapse [33], suggesting it might suppress GVHD without impeding GVVR.  While significant 

Ac

clinical advances have reduced the frequency of severe GVHD, there is still a 7% transplant‐associated  mortality rate in patients with malignancies, a rate that far exceeds what would be acceptable for 

healthy HIV‐infected patients on cART.    

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

cells that become infected with HIV, while promoting full donor chimerism and, in that process, 

10  Can we protect transplanted cells from HIV infection?  As discussed, it may be possible to use conditioning regimens and GVVR responses to reduce or 

cr ipt

eliminate HIV reservoirs.  In addition, it will be critical to prevent any transplanted cells from becoming 

infected and establishing new reservoirs.  While maintaining patients on cART throughout the transplant  period should theoretically prevent infection of donor cells, concerns about drug‐drug interactions often  lead physicians to discontinue antiretrovirals during transplantation [6, 34].  In addition, patients 

efforts have been made to identify more tolerable cART regimens [34], even the most effective cART 

an

regimens may fail to adequately penetrate all tissues and fully suppress HIV replication [35, 36].  Viremic spikes have been observed post‐transplant in NHP models, even when cART was 

M

meticulously maintained (Leslie Kean, unpublished).  A likely explanation is that some latently infected T  cells become activated during transplantation, thereby stimulating virus production, as documented in  murine models of latent retrovirus infection.  Indeed, the viral outgrowth assay used to quantify 

pt ed

replication‐competent HIV in peripheral blood relies upon the in vitro activation of CD4 T cells through a  mixed lymphocyte reaction to stimulate viral replication.  These observations suggest that HIV  reactivation will accompany transplant‐associated GVH responses and may not be suppressed  adequately by cART.  Thus, preventing infection of transplanted grafts requires novel approaches. 

ce

One approach to preventing infection post‐transplantation is to use grafts that intrinsically resist 

HIV infection.  Intrinsic resistance was almost certainly a key element of the Berlin patient’s cure.  CCR5 

Ac

is a co‐receptor for cellular entry by HIV.  Individuals who are homozygous for the nonfunctional CCR5‐ D32 allele are highly resistant to HIV infection [7].  The Berlin patient’s transplant donor was 

homozygous for the CCR5‐D32 allele.  In addition, the Berlin patient himself is a CCR5‐D32 heterozygote.  

Heterozygosity for CCR5‐D32 is associated with delayed progression of HIV disease [37] and recent data 

suggests that CCR5‐D32 heterozygotes have lower HIV reservoirs (Steven Deeks, unpublished).   

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

undergoing transplantation often develop nausea and become intolerant of oral medications.  While 

11  Like the Berlin patient, both Boston patients were CCR5‐D32 heterozygotes.  However, they  received transplants from CCR5 wild type donors. Thus, their relapses may have resulted from post‐

cr ipt

transplant infection of donor cells, possibly due to GVH‐induced activation of latently infected memory T  cells leading to HIV replication. 

Only 1% of donors of European descent are CCR5‐D32 homozygotes and the frequency is even  lower in donors of African descent.  Thus, it will be difficult to identify well‐matched homozygous D32 

infect T cells.  Accordingly, it will be important to develop other approaches to protecting grafts from 

an

HIV infection.  One possible solution is to supply patients with genetically modified cells that resist HIV  infection.  A number of genetic engineering strategies are being explored in NHP models and humans 

M

with promising results [38, 39].     

pt ed

Additional challenges and research questions 

A number of questions were highlighted by the workshop (Box 1) and it remains to be seen  whether we can exploit GVH‐based approaches to cure HIV in a safe, scalable and widely applicable  manner.  One major obstacle is the need for better assays to determine when cART can be discontinued.   Currently available assays for HIV are inadequate to detect all latently infected cells.  Likewise, the PCR‐

ce

based assays commonly used to measure donor chimerism after HSCT cannot distinguish whether low‐ level positivity reflects residual hematopoietic cells potentially bearing HIV genomes or harmless non‐

Ac

hematopoietic cells contaminating blood at low frequencies.  It will also be challenging to adequately 

sample every tissue that may harbor residual recipient hematopoietic cells potentially carrying latent  HIV.  Moreover, a subset HIV sequences found in the blood of patients on cART do not correspond to  virus found in circulating T cells, suggesting they may derive from yet to be identified reservoirs [40]. 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

transplant donors for many HIV patients.  Also, some HIV variants can bypass CCR5 and use CXCR4 to 

12  Based on current understanding, a prototype cure strategy for HIV‐infected patients requiring  HSCT for another indication (e.g. malignancy) would leverage pre‐transplant conditioning to deplete HIV 

cr ipt

reservoirs and then enlist GVVR responses to eradicate residual reservoirs while preventing infection of  transplanted cells by maintaining cART throughout the procedure and/or using HIV‐resistant grafts.  

Should such an approach prove effective, extending it more generally to the HIV‐infected community  will still require substantial reductions in HSCT‐associated morbidity and better assays for residual 

communities will be necessary to overcome these significant challenges. 

an

More detailed summaries of the workshop presentations are provided as Supplemental  Material. 

M

 

Box 1.  Key questions arising from this workshop. 

What mechanisms can reduce the HIV reservoir following HSCT? 

o

Can GVH responses safely, reliably and reproducibly eradicate HIV reservoirs?  

o

Can GVH responses be targeted specifically toward HIV‐infected cells, or will HSCT‐based 

pt ed

o

cure regimens require complete myeloablation and 100% chimerism?    Do donor‐derived T cells, NK cells and other cells mediate HSCT‐associated antiviral 

ce

o

responses? 

Can assays be developed to determine when complete HIV eradication is achieved?   

o

What tissues and samples should be assayed before discontinuing cART?   

o

Can the morbidity and safety risks associated with transplantation‐based cure regimens be 

Ac

o

reduced to a level acceptable for patients who do not require HSCT for malignancies? 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

us

reservoirs of latently infected cells.  Collaboration between the HIV and transplantation research 

13    Acknowledgments 

cr ipt

We thank the workshop organizers, speakers and session moderators: Richard Ambinder, John  Barrett, Catherine Bollard, Nancy Bridges, Nelson Chao, Steven Deeks, Carl Dieffenbach, Michele Di 

Mascio, Christine Durand, Sean Emery, Anthony Fauci, Daniel Fowler, Juan Gea‐Banacloche, Ronald 

Gress, Charles Hackett, Timothy Henrich, Katherine Hsu, Robert Jenq, Leslie Kean, Hans‐Peter Kiem, 

us

Meyer, Sophie Paczesny, Deborah Persaud, Effie Petersdorf, Pavan Reddy, Warren Shlomchik, John 

an

Tisdale, Lis Welniak, and Ann Woolfrey. 

Ac

ce

pt ed

M

The authors report no related conflicts of interest.  

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

Robert Korngold, Kristy Kraemer, Daniel Kuritzkes, Clifford Lane, Jeffrey Lifson, John Mellors, Everett 

14    References 

1. 

cr ipt

 

Deeks SG, Lewin SR, Havlir DV. The end of AIDS: HIV infection as a chronic disease. Lancet 2013;  382(9903): 1525‐33. 

2. 

Passaes CP, Saez‐Cirion A. HIV cure research: advances and prospects. Virology 2014; 454‐455: 

us

3. 

Finzi D, Hermankova M, Pierson T, et al. Identification of a reservoir for HIV‐1 in patients on 

4. 

an

highly active antiretroviral therapy. Science 1997; 278(5341): 1295‐300. 

Laird GM, Eisele EE, Rabi SA, et al. Rapid quantification of the latent reservoir for HIV‐1 using a 

5. 

M

viral outgrowth assay. PLoS pathogens 2013; 9(5): e1003398. 

Hutter G, Nowak D, Mossner M, et al. Long‐term control of HIV by CCR5 Delta32/Delta32 stem‐ cell transplantation. The New England journal of medicine 2009; 360(7): 692‐8.  Hutter G, Zaia JA. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with human 

pt ed

6. 

immunodeficiency virus: the experiences of more than 25 years. Clinical and experimental  immunology 2011; 163(3): 284‐95.  7. 

Dean M, Carrington M, Winkler C, et al. Genetic restriction of HIV‐1 infection and progression to 

ce

AIDS by a deletion allele of the CKR5 structural gene. Hemophilia Growth and Development  Study, Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, Multicenter Hemophilia Cohort Study, San Francisco City 

Ac

Cohort, ALIVE Study. Science 1996; 273(5283): 1856‐62. 

8. 

Yukl SA, Boritz E, Busch M, et al. Challenges in detecting HIV persistence during potentially  curative interventions: a study of the Berlin patient. PLoS pathogens 2013; 9(5): e1003347. 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

340‐52. 

15  9. 

Henrich TJ, Hu Z, Li JZ, et al. Long‐term reduction in peripheral blood HIV type 1 reservoirs  following reduced‐intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The Journal of 

10. 

cr ipt

infectious diseases 2013; 207(11): 1694‐702.  Ho YC, Shan L, Hosmane NN, et al. Replication‐competent noninduced proviruses in the latent  reservoir increase barrier to HIV‐1 cure. Cell 2013; 155(3): 540‐51.  11. 

Shan L, Deng K, Shroff NS, et al. Stimulation of HIV‐1‐specific cytolytic T lymphocytes facilitates 

Perez M, de Vinuesa AG, Sanchez‐Duffhues G, et al. Bryostatin‐1 synergizes with histone 

13. 

an

deacetylase inhibitors to reactivate HIV‐1 from latency. Current HIV research 2010; 8(6): 418‐29.  Rasmussen TA, Schmeltz Sogaard O, Brinkmann C, et al. Comparison of HDAC inhibitors in  clinical development: effect on HIV production in latently infected cells and T‐cell activation. 

14. 

M

Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics 2013; 9(5): 993‐1001. 

Archin NM, Liberty AL, Kashuba AD, et al. Administration of vorinostat disrupts HIV‐1 latency in 

15. 

pt ed

patients on antiretroviral therapy. Nature 2012; 487(7408): 482‐5.  Cillo AR, Krishnan A, Mitsuyasu RT, et al. Plasma viremia and cellular HIV‐1 DNA persist despite  autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for HIV‐related lymphoma. Journal of  acquired immune deficiency syndromes 2013; 63(4): 438‐41.  Di Mascio M, Paik CH, Carrasquillo JA, et al. Noninvasive in vivo imaging of CD4 cells in simian‐

ce

16. 

human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)‐infected nonhuman primates. Blood 2009; 114(2): 328‐

37. 

Rezvani K, Barrett AJ. Characterizing and optimizing immune responses to leukaemia antigens 

Ac

17. 

after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Best practice & research Clinical haematology 2008; 

21(3): 437‐53. 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

12. 

us

elimination of latent viral reservoir after virus reactivation. Immunity 2012; 36(3): 491‐501. 

16  18. 

Williams KM, Gress RE. Immune reconstitution and implications for immunotherapy following  haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Best practice & research Clinical haematology 2008; 

19. 

cr ipt

21(3): 579‐96.  Paczesny S, Hanauer D, Sun Y, Reddy P. New perspectives on the biology of acute GVHD. Bone  marrow transplantation 2010; 45(1): 1‐11.  20. 

Petersdorf EW. The major histocompatibility complex: a model for understanding graft‐versus‐

Jenq RR, Ubeda C, Taur Y, et al. Regulation of intestinal inflammation by microbiota following 

an

allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The Journal of experimental medicine 2012; 209(5):  903‐11. 

Shlomchik WD. Graft‐versus‐host disease. Nature reviews Immunology 2007; 7(5): 340‐52. 

23. 

Saglio F, Hanley PJ, Bollard CM. The time is now: moving toward virus‐specific T cells after 

M

22. 

allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as the standard of care. Cytotherapy 2014; 

24. 

pt ed

16(2): 149‐59. 

Friedman TM, Goldgirsh K, Berger SA, et al. Overlap between in vitro donor antihost and in vivo  posttransplantation TCR Vbeta use: a new paradigm for designer allogeneic blood and marrow  transplantation. Blood 2008; 112(8): 3517‐25.  Luznik L, Bolanos‐Meade J, Zahurak M, et al. High‐dose cyclophosphamide as single‐agent, 

ce

25. 

short‐course prophylaxis of graft‐versus‐host disease. Blood 2010; 115(16): 3224‐30. 

26. 

Bolanos‐Meade J, Fuchs EJ, Luznik L, et al. HLA‐haploidentical bone marrow transplantation with 

Ac

posttransplant cyclophosphamide expands the donor pool for patients with sickle cell disease.  Blood 2012; 120(22): 4285‐91. 

27. 

Moretta L, Locatelli F, Pende D, et al. Human NK receptors: from the molecules to the therapy of 

high risk leukemias. FEBS letters 2011; 585(11): 1563‐7. 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

21. 

us

host disease. Blood 2013; 122(11): 1863‐72. 

17  28. 

Song R, Lisovsky I, Lebouche B, Routy JP, Bruneau J, Bernard NF. HIV protective KIR3DL1/S1‐HLA‐ B genotypes influence NK cell‐mediated inhibition of HIV replication in autologous CD4 targets. 

29. 

cr ipt

PLoS pathogens 2014; 10(1): e1003867.  Martin MP, Qi Y, Gao X, et al. Innate partnership of HLA‐B and KIR3DL1 subtypes against HIV‐1.  Nature genetics 2007; 39(6): 733‐40.  30. 

Venstrom JM, Pittari G, Gooley TA, et al. HLA‐C‐dependent prevention of leukemia relapse by 

Apps R, Qi Y, Carlson JM, et al. Influence of HLA‐C expression level on HIV control. Science 2013; 

32. 

an

340(6128): 87‐91. 

Kean LS, Singh K, Blazar BR, Larsen CP. Nonhuman primate transplant models finally evolve:  detailed immunogenetic analysis creates new models and strengthens the old. American journal 

M

of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American  Society of Transplant Surgeons 2012; 12(4): 812‐9. 

Choi SW, Braun T, Chang L, et al. Vorinostat plus tacrolimus and mycophenolate to prevent 

pt ed

33. 

graft‐versus‐host disease after related‐donor reduced‐intensity conditioning allogeneic  haemopoietic stem‐cell transplantation: a phase 1/2 trial. The lancet oncology 2014; 15(1): 87‐ 95. 

Durand CM, Ambinder RF. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in HIV‐1‐infected individuals: 

ce

34. 

clinical challenges and the potential for viral eradication. Current opinion in oncology 2013;  25(2): 180‐6. 

Fletcher CV, Staskus K, Wietgrefe SW, et al. Persistent HIV‐1 replication is associated with lower 

Ac

35. 

antiretroviral drug concentrations in lymphatic tissues. Proceedings of the National Academy of  Sciences of the United States of America 2014; 111(6): 2307‐12. 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

31. 

us

donor activating KIR2DS1. The New England journal of medicine 2012; 367(9): 805‐16. 

18  36. 

Sigal A, Kim JT, Balazs AB, et al. Cell‐to‐cell spread of HIV permits ongoing replication despite  antiretroviral therapy. Nature 2011; 477(7362): 95‐8.  de Roda Husman AM, Koot M, Cornelissen M, et al. Association between CCR5 genotype and the 

cr ipt

37. 

clinical course of HIV‐1 infection. Annals of internal medicine 1997; 127(10): 882‐90.  38. 

Younan P, Kowalski J, Kiem HP. Genetically modified hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for  HIV‐1‐infected patients: can we achieve a cure? Molecular therapy : the journal of the American 

Tebas P, Stein D, Tang WW, et al. Gene editing of CCR5 in autologous CD4 T cells of persons 

40. 

an

infected with HIV. The New England journal of medicine 2014; 370(10): 901‐10.  Brennan TP, Woods JO, Sedaghat AR, Siliciano JD, Siliciano RF, Wilke CO. Analysis of human  immunodeficiency virus type 1 viremia and provirus in resting CD4+ T cells reveals a novel 

8470‐81. 

M

source of residual viremia in patients on antiretroviral therapy. Journal of virology 2009; 83(17): 

Ac

ce

pt ed

 

Downloaded from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/ at Gazi Universitesi on October 4, 2014

39. 

us

Society of Gene Therapy 2014; 22(2): 257‐64. 

Progress toward curing HIV infections with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Combination antiretroviral therapy can suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection but cannot completely eradicate the virus. A major obstac...
413KB Sizes 0 Downloads 6 Views