promptly and successfully set themselves to qualify for the higher preliminary test, and it spealcs well for the vitality of the higher medical education in this Presidency that the depression caused by the raising of the standard of preliminary knowledge was not deeper and longer. The quality of instruction gained in the College cannot but be improved immensely by the

knowledge

better

of

English

which the

previous

pass-

ing of the First Examination in Arts implies. There is, however, a dark side to the picture. The Principal reports that no fewer than 86 of the students of the

paying CALCUTTA MEDICAL

THE

Saturday, the 15th of June, with a registering something like 100 degrees

thermometer of

College during

the

course

of the

Session owing to inability to pay the fees. He attributes this result to excessive expenditure of money on social ceremonies and lawsuits. Whatever the cause, it is a matter of regret that such a large proportion of

COLLEGE.

Ox

class left the

tempera-

ture, the 44th Session of the Calcutta Medical College was opened, the Hon'ble William Markby, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Calcutta, presiding. The occasion was occupied, as usual of late years, by the reading of the Report of the previous Session, the distribution of prizes won at its close, and the

improvidence

delivery of a short address to the students by the gentleman presiding. The Report of the previous Session, drawn up and read by the Officiating Principal, Surgeon-Major J. M. Coates, M. D., is full interest. of Teaching in the College is now the Primary or to two classes, confined entirely

pay for their education to enter the Medical College ; but this is a species of gambling which should not be

English

class and the

Hospital Apprentice class,

students

recklessness, and it were better if paguardians counted the cost of medical education before allowing their sons and wards to enter the College. No doubt the hope or chance of obtaining a Scholarship induces many youths who are unable to

their studies

and

entering on these the belonged to the paying class,

66

Of these 163

belonging

that of the

to this class

previous year, 317, and past decade, 386. This result is

was

One hundred and

encouraged. went

final examination

one

students

for the

the License in Medicine and

the

degree Surgery,

of M.

under-

B.,

and

of whom 41

proportion of 40'5 per cent. Sixty per cent high rate of failure, but with a higher preliminary test of general education, this proportion may reasonably be expected to fall. Seventy-seven out of 126 passed their first professional examination, or 61*1 This lower percentage of failure (39*9) per cent. we may, trust, be accepted as a token of better things in future as regards the final examination. There is a curious description of student termed the " casual" included in the foregoing numbers. The " casual" is

passed,

is

first 128

of former years and 35 new admissions ; the remainder were scholarship holders and free students. The

number of students

or

rents and

Vernacular classes having been removed to the Temple School at Patna and the Campbell School at Sealdali. The number of students of the former class was at the commencement of the Session 218, 167 resuming time.

unable to persevere in their studies on poverty. The circumstance indicates either

were

account of

below

the average of the due to the harder

a

a

subjected

to no

preliminary examination,

and he is not

conditions of entrance now imposed by the University. Formerly the University Entrance Examination was

the. other hand entitled to any of the special privileges of the school or University?prize, scholarship,

preliminary to admission into the Medical passing the First Arts Examination of the College ; is University required, by the regulations, of candidates for the University License in Medicine and Surgery, and

license

on

the necessary

price

now

the degree of M. B. A. is

B.,

and the

possession

of the

degree

Us. 15 as an entrance fee and " casual" has to pay lis. 40 per class and Rs. 60 for six months' hospital attend-

paying Es. 5

of

of candidates for the degree of

required This regulation M. D. and became applicable for

was

passed

ance.

student is

as a

The

charged

monthly fee, "

the

casual" is in fact

a

young

gentleman

who

intends completing his medical education in Britain ; but finds it convenient to take a few classes in Cal-

in the year 1874

the first time to the entrants of 1875. The diminished number of students is entirely owing to this circumstance. Only 18 new students Last year the were enrolled in 1875, and 16 in 1876. the number was 41, of whom 25 joined paying class.

It The average of the years 1871-4 had been 148. have so that to the of is creditable they youth Bengal

He has, moreover, to pay a higher or degree. for the instruction he receives, for whereas the

a view to economy as regards time and in England. The class is a somewhat anomamoney the one lous ; but derives some justification from is debar to It case. of the quite right, circumstances

cutta with

students from the ,

privileges

prizes, scholarships,

of the

licenses and

school, degrees,

as

if

regards they do

*Tuly 1,

THE CALCUTTA MEDICAL COLLEGE.

1878.]

391

passed and 7 were discharged,?5 for failing matter of preliminary examination. Instruction cannot to pass and 2 for misconduct?leaving a balance of 30 the session. Principal Coates agrees very well be denied to any one willing to pay for it; at the close of with his and it seems right, when the classes and predecessors in considering the preliminary hospital are to ostensibly taken, with a view to obtaining English qua- training which these men are subjected with Eulifications, that something like the prices paid in Eng- ropean regiments, before entering the College, to be a admission. But land should be charged for them. Still the question mistake, and pleads for their direct not space to have these we are considerations on which of permitting students to enter classes in the Medical the present of enter retention which render the without now, College having passed the preliminary exaThe statistics of the Vernacular mination laid down by the University regulations is system advisable. school at Sealdah show a falling off in numbers. one open to discussion ,? and we think the matter ought This result is attributed to (1) the opening of vernacular to be very carefully considered by the College Council, not

comply with

or

rather

the regulations of the institution in the

for

re-considered,

been made the

already

decision. There

were

no

subject

doubt the of

point

has

deliberation and

10 students of this

description dur-

Perhaps, if the medical license ing and degrees of the Calcutta University obtain legal recognition in England, and we should rejoice if it the session 1877-78.

were

lapse

so, the reason for the existence of this class may and the class itself disappear. But, whatever

tliese 26

schools

at Patna and Dacca ;

the

(2)

raising of

the

standard of the preliminary examination ; and (3) the reduction of the pay of supernumerary native doctors in Government

employ

from Es. 20 to Rs. 10.

The record of lectures and demonstrations delivered

by

the

and the

professors during the session is very creditable, large number of bodies (263) utilized for

teaching anatomy

and surgery indicates that the prac-

properly is a strong point in these courses. Among improvements in the teaching arrangements are (1) the fitting up of a part of the cheThe casual students' mical laboratory for the class of practical chemistry. description of these students. The arrangements for storing chemicals and teaching come for only a few years to school, and after having chemistry are still most defective and inappropriate, attended a few lectures for a year or two, return to and a radical reformation is needed. The separation their country and, I believe, practise as native doctors.

justification there may be for a class of casual students in the college, there is none we think for a similar class in the Vernacular school. Here is Dr. S. C. Mackenzie's "

Many

of them

students

solely

regular

'

' very ignorant, and join as casual' because they are unable to pass the

are

Entrance Examination students

prior

required

to be

undergone by

to admission to the school.

the

Their

number has increased from 17 during the previous session to 47 in this ; two and three only were able to ' pass the Entrance Examination ;' 14 had to be struck off the rolls for not

paying

their

schooling fees,

and 25

remained at the end of the session." These men in fact constitute irregular practitioners of the worst descrip-

immethodical smattering knowledge, worse than even the " plucked" student who, though he fails to pass the examination qualifying him for practising his profession, has nevertheless undergone a systematic course of tion?men with

of

slight,

a

?theoretical medical

instruction

including

the

practical

and clinical elements.

hesitation whatever in declaring that, in the interests of the native public, these " casual students" should be debarred the school, and that no We have

no

student should be permitted to enter any vernacular medical school who has not passed the Entrance Exa-

mination, and who does not declare tion of going regularly through the school.

We noticed in

our

his bona

fide

inten-

the curriculum of issue for May the im-

provement which has taken place in the conduct and

application class

to their studies of the

; 48 of these

of the

session,

hospital apprentice

students remained at the

and' 15 joined,

tical element very

making

a

beginning

total of 63. Of

medico-legal analysis department from the College laboratory is shown to be a pressing desideratum. (2) Considerable additions to the Pathological of the

These

and Materia Medica Museums.

industry

Professors

of

due to the

are

and

MacConnell

Chandra.

The accommodation for the Materia Medica is still very defective, but there is a change for the better in this respect. of a set of diagrams Systematic Surgery. These

paration on

and Professor

Gayer

museum

prospect of

a

(3) The preto illustrate the lectures very much

were

has conferred

wanted,

very substantial

a

benefit upon the College in getting them executed. (4) The re- arrangement of the library and reading room and cataloguing the contents of the former. There remains

crying want which we hope to see supplied long, namely, practical instruction in This branch has hitherto occupied a very physiology. in secondary place the curriculum when it ought to have a primary and prominent position. Physiology ought undoubtedly to constitute a major professorship; and in addition to systematic oral instruction, there ought to be a physiological laboratory, in which a course of one

very

ere

practical instruction should

be

given

to each student.

considered necessary in Europe, and nothing short of this will suffice for the Calcutta Medical School if it is to keep abreast of the world.

This is what is

We

are

glad

now

to observe

the late Baboo

that, through the

Chooneelal

Seal,

a

new

munificence of

medical and

192

surgical dispensary

THE INDIAN MEDICAL GAZETTE.

is to be built.

The

out-patient

department has hitherto been miserably accommodated in the ground floor of the hospital. The change, as well as others which are in contemplation, and which we hope to be able to report as sanctioned ere long, will no doubt add much to the salubrity of the hospital and its efficiency as a means of clinical instruction. In this respect the figures recorded by Principal Coates indicate that there has been no abatement. 4,431 indoor and 22,144 outdoor patients were treated during the year. 229 major and 6,025 minor operations were performed. 536 indoor and 5,404 outdoor patients treated in the Ophthalmic Hospital, and 237 eye operations performed. 3,954 patients were treated in the dental dispensary, and 3,534 dental operations performed. The report for the past session gives evidence of unabated enthusiasm and industry on the part of the Principal and his coadjutors, and we trust that year by year we shall be able to chronicle equal advances in raising the standard and improving the means and appliances of instruction. were

[July 1,

1878-

The Calcutta Medical College.

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